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Startups are the new gold rush. It’s trendy to be smart, it’s trendy to have your own business, and it’s trendy to invent. If the stories of your mother’s best friends’ twenty-something year old children being Silicon residents make you a bit snarky, don’t miss a moment. The year 2020 is all about opportunities. Especially for robo-geeks.

Read our three pieces of advice for finding free niches for your project, and pick up ideas that are just in front of you!

  1. See Problems as Opportunities

The widespread quote of John F. Kennedy “When written in Chinese, the word ‘crisis’ is composed of two characters — one stands for danger and another represents opportunity” is not actually true. But, as the hero of Arrival movie said, “This is not true. However, it is a great metaphor”. Seeing every crisis as a big pot of ideas and opportunities brewing in it make for a great attitude.

Firstly, the crisis shows weaknesses of every system. The coronavirus-crisis has shown the frustrating lack of medical staff, and zero readiness of some businesses to work remotely. Each day there is news about robots that will take tests, robots that will help patients to resist stress, robots that will ride through the hospital and control the patients’ temperature. All these ideas could have come to  someone’s mind even before 2020, but the right moment is now.

So look around and analyze which businesses were affected the most. How could they be helped using robotics? Are you thinking of a robot at a Barbershop? Why not! Robotic Barista? Excellent! Robot personal trainer? Yep!

Almost any repetitive task can be performed by a collaborative robot without losing in the efficiency but gaining in the accuracy and productivity, so even when ‘keep distance, bro’ stops being the everyday motto, an effective robot will still do its job.

  1. Look over the borders

We, as human beings, are surprisingly lazy. Our brains are lazy beasts. The comfort zone is not just a metaphor applied when talking about habits, it also describes the way we take and process the information. That’s why it’s so hard to accept new ideas or look out of the box. Our brain gets used to specific rails, and rides on them time after time just like a train would.

To come up with something other than robots testing the whole world for coronavirus, try boosting your creativity with brain training such as TRIZ techniques.

TRIZ or TIPS is a theory of the resolution of invention-related tasks. Initially, it was developed by a Soviet inventor and science fiction writer Genrich Altshuller. Altshuller researched the way inventors come up with new ideas, how they think, what they do, what their creativity patterns are, etc. Based on the research results, he formulated 40 principles of the invention.

In 1998, Karen Gadd launched Oxford Creativity, known as Oxford TRIZ, which was trademarked in 2013.

  1. Use Accelerators and Business Incubators

If you are afraid to invest your time and efforts in the idea without having any proof that it will be accepted on the market and will attract partners and clients, go in the opposite direction. Search through the accelerators, contests, and business incubators. Try to adapt your idea to their conditions and requirements. Here are some lists that are useful for robotics:

  1. GLOBAL STARTUP ACCELERATOR INDEX 
  2. Ten Best Startup Incubators In The World
  3. List of Europe’s Best Accelerators Incubators
  4. The Hardware Incubators Accelerators List
  5. 20 Best Accelerators
  6. 10 Incubators in AI
  7. AI Accelerators and Incubators
  8. Silicon Valley Incubators
  9. Incubators and Accelerators
  10. Singapore for Startups
  11. Egypt’s Startup Resources List

Even robot skeptics confirm that coronavirus, lockdown, and social crisis have sped up the Industry 4.0. So all you need is a vision and the courage to join the wave.

Image Credit: Phonlamai Photo / Shutterstock

Hanna Kidron survived getting a degree in International Communication. Creative writer inspired by the tech-future and all that brings our world to motion. Avid Reader of Isaac Asimov and Elon Musk’s Twitter. Currently working at a robotics company.