business opportunity

Should You Play this Video Games ETF?

Video games aren’t just games. They are also TV content, judging by the millions of people who watched some 1.75 billion hours of streamed video-gaming programming on Twitch, the live-stream platform for gamers, just in May alone. They’re live events, too, with thousands of people showing up to watch top-level gamers face off in e-sports arenas. That makes video games big, big business. Consultant Research and Markets forecasts that the global video-game market will increase revenues at a 6.4% annualized rate between 2019 and 2024, when it will hit $179.1 billion in sales.

Global X Video Games & Esports ETF is one of a handful of funds that allow investors to cash in on that growth. HERO sports a tight portfolio of 40 firms involved in developing, publishing, distributing or streaming video games, producing related hardware, or operating e-sports leagues or teams. The fund weights holdings by market value, so the larger the stock, the more HERO invests in it. Gaming is global, and so is HERO; it has 71% of assets invested outside of the U.S.

The ETF will only invest in companies that derive at least 50% of their revenues from video game–related businesses. That means you won’t see tech conglomerates such as Sony and Microsoft in the fund. You will see graphics chipmaker Nvidia, whose products power high-end gaming rigs; Chinese internet and video gaming company NetEase; and familiar Japanese powerhouse Nintendo. “If it’s a leading company in the theme, we want to own that company,” says

Read More

Influencers live a pandemic-free fantasy, Quibi dismisses ‘YouTuber ideas,’ and what’s happening with Shane Dawson

influencers_gathering
influencers_gathering

Instagram/TikTok

Happy Thursday!

This is Amanda Perelli and welcome back to Influencer Dashboard, our weekly rundown of what’s new in the influencer and creator economy.

Before we get started, I want to first introduce a new reporter on BI’s business of influencers team: Sydney Bradley! You can reach Sydney and say hi at [email protected] and on Twitter @SydneyKBradley. She will be covering Instagram, TikTok, and all things related to the business of internet creators and influencers.

And now to the news.

This week, Dan Whateley and I wrote a piece on the influencers who are ignoring the coronavirus pandemic on social media, and how Los Angeles health officials want these creators to stop living a dangerous, mask-free fantasy. 

LA is bracing for a potentially devastating wave of coronavirus cases as COVID-19 transmissions and hospitalizations both spiked this week.

But for many of LA’s celebrities and influencers, it appears life has returned to normal, with some choosing to collaborate without masks in videos, host parties, and in some cases travel out of the country.

Here are some examples:

  • Influencer and MTV star Tana Mongeau threw a two-day birthday bash at a Beverly Hills mansion last week and documented the event on Instagram.

  • Music artist Jason Derulo, who has over 25 million followers on TikTok, has been appearing in group videos with other TikTok stars throughout June.

  • A Capitol Records exec hosted a birthday party over the weekend in Los Angeles. TikTok star Addison Rae Easterling (48 million followers), musician

Read More

How Can Influencers Stay Relevant Amid Global Concerns?

Click here to read the full article.

As recent as this past February, influencers’ social media pages were full of imagery of global fashion weeks, giving eager followers behind-the-scenes looks and glimpses into exclusive after parties. Today, these same social media pages look quite different, reflecting instead on a longer period spent at home that spotlighted family members rather than designers or celebrity insiders.

Since becoming a staple in the fashion industry, influencers have also been a continued access point for brands to reach wide audiences. And early reports stated that although influencer marketing would change during the pandemic it could prove to be extremely powerful amid the crisis. According to Influence Central, since the onset of COVID-19, 64 percent of consumers are doing all clothing and apparel shopping online and thus causing direct impact on how brands and the influencers they work with will engage followers and drive shopper marketing.

“The influencers aren’t the only player that should be pivoting strategy in this post-COVID-19 environment,” said Stacy DeBroff, chief executive officer of Influence Central. “From a marketing perspective, fashion brands need to shift from traditional advertising and catalogue marketing to invest in social media marketing and influencer engagements. This creates a new type of opportunity for brands collaborating with fashion influencers in social media campaigns. Social media platforms from Instagram to Pinterest have introduced myriad ways to shop from online pictures and influencer content. With online products accessible, consumers have an avenue to purchase themselves in the moment and

Read More

Big business, political strategy and corporate involvement in US state politics

<span class="caption">Protesters rally to have Colorado's then-incoming governor put an up-to-nine-month moratorium on oil and gas development.</span> <span class="attribution"><a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="https://www.gettyimages.com/detail/news-photo/from-left-to-right-sandy-tolland-in-hat-miranda-glasbergen-news-photo/1076896552?adppopup=true" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post via Getty Images">Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post via Getty Images</a></span>
Protesters rally to have Colorado’s then-incoming governor put an up-to-nine-month moratorium on oil and gas development. Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post via Getty Images

Political spending by corporations is big business.

As one corporate executive with experience in business-government relations says, “A company that is dependent on government that does not donate to politicians is engaging in corporate malpractice.”

Our research group heard that statement during a series of interviews with industry insiders that we conducted for a study on corporate political strategy and involvement in U.S state politics.

In the 2018 election cycle, for example, private interests spent US$500 million on campaign contributions to U.S. federal election candidates and nearly $7 billion to lobby federal officials.

As shown by campaign finance monitor the Center for Responsive Politics, those firms most affected by government regulation spend more. The operations of Facebook, for example, could be heavily affected by government legislation, whether from laws concerning net neutrality, data privacy, censorship or the company’s classification as a platform or publisher. Facebook spent over $2 million in contributions and $24 million in lobbying during the same period.

This kind of political spending is also common across state governments. From Alaska to Alabama, firms spend huge sums of money to influence policymaking because they depend on their local business environments, resources and regulations.

For example, after Citizens United, a landmark 2010 U.S. Supreme Court decision that freed corporations (as well as nonprofits, unions and other associations) to spend

Read More
businessmential.com © All rights reserved. | Magazine 7 by NYOCOT!!!.