Paul Taka

Opening day on July 4 could have been something special. Too bad MLB blew it

Major League Baseball missed a golden — actually, a red-white-and-blue — marketing opportunity by failing to launch its season on July 4. <span class="copyright">(Mark Brown / Getty Images)</span>
Major League Baseball missed a golden — actually, a red-white-and-blue — marketing opportunity by failing to launch its season on July 4. (Mark Brown / Getty Images)

If only baseball had gotten its act together this spring, it could have staged a grand reopening act this summer, a kickoff to a pandemic-shortened season for America’s pastime on the most American of holidays — the Fourth of July.

“Oh, you mean baseball, hot dogs, apple pie and Chevrolet?” sports business consultant Andy Dolich, 73, said, recalling the television advertising jingle that first aired in 1975. “Fireworks, families and communities coming together for a celebration … who’d be interested in that?”

The sarcasm in Dolich’s voice was as clear as his message: Major League Baseball missed a golden — actually, a red-white-and-blue — marketing opportunity by failing to launch its season July 4.

Sure, there would have been less pomp under the circumstances. With stadiums empty, there would be no need for the unfurling of giant American flags, military flyovers and extravagant postgame fireworks shows.

But if owners and players hadn’t spent three months haggling over money, a dispute that pushed what is now a scheduled 60-game season to July 23, baseball could have had the domestic sports stage to itself for weeks, returning well before the NBA and NHL.

And MLB could have produced a Fourth of July extravaganza, airing multiple season openers throughout the day to a country craving live sporting events and a distraction from the coronavirus

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How email apps launched some of the most innovative ideas in software

Capiche is a secret society for SaaS power users, building a new community of people who care about software to make the SaaS industry more transparent, together. This article was written by Matthew Guay, Capiche‘s founding editor and former senior writer at Zapier.

The problems with email were there from the beginning.

You’d be reading documentation, see something to improve, and wish you could tell the author.

For MIT’s programming staff in 1965, that idea led to the invention of email. “A new command should be written to allow a user to send a private message to another user which may be delivered at the receiver’s convenience,” wrote the team. “This will be useful for the system to notify a user that … files have been backed-up,” presciently imagining email as a notifications inbox.

More fatefully, they continued: “It will also be useful for users to send authors any criticisms.”

We’ve been trying to escape those automated notifications and unsolicited feedback letters ever since.

The mail command in macOS Terminal
The mail command in macOS Terminal

Email was a simple enough concept, with a file name (what became the email subject), a user (what became email addresses), and the message. The MIT team’s proposal assumed “The proposed MAIL command can be written,” which proved true. Writing the MAIL command only took the summer of 1965.

Decades have passed, though, and email still hasn’t been perfected.

[Read: How SaaS reinvented shareware and killed piracy]

It’s not for lack of trying.

An email app

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FCA to tell lenders to extend payment freeze on car finance and high-cost credit

New and nearly new cars are displayed for sale on a forecourt of a car dealership. (Matt Cardy/Getty Images)
New and nearly new cars are displayed for sale on a forecourt of a car dealership. (Matt Cardy/Getty Images)

The UK’s Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) on Friday indicated that it will tell rent-to-own firms, car finance providers, and pawnbrokers to keep offering payment freezes to borrowers in financial difficulty in the wake of the coronavirus crisis.

Under extended proposals, customers who have yet to request a payment freeze would also have until 31 October to do so, the FCA said.

Under a payment holiday announced in April, the FCA ordered firms to give drivers a three-month freeze on payments if the pandemic had left them in temporary financial difficulty. It told firms not to end agreements or repossess vehicles for such customers.

READ MORE: Quiet end to the week for stocks as US coronavirus numbers in focus

Firms offering rent-to-own, “buy now, pay later” and pawnbroking agreements were also expected to provide a three-month payment freeze for struggling customers.

Customers who have already sought support under these initiatives would be entitled to further support, such as payment deferrals or reductions, for a further three months, the watchdog said.

The ban on repossessions should also continue until 31 October, it advised.

READ MORE: ‘Green recovery’ risks voter backlash unless it boosts households and jobs

The FCA said that it had opened a consultation on the proposals and welcomed comments from industry on them by the close of business on 6 July, noting that it expected to finalise the guidance to

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Leading Dutch F1 Ticket & Experiences Business Integrated Into Motorsport Tickets

The new platform releasing soon from Motorsport Tickets will offer a comprehensive solution to circuit and series owners as well as simplifying the whole customer experience.

Motorsport Network are investing in the future of ticketing and racing experiences, taking full control and integrating SportStadion, a leading Netherlands based motorsport tickets and experiences business into its existing Motorsport Tickets offering. This follows the earlier acquisition and integration of Bookf1 in January, which subsequently changed its name to Motorsport Tickets

Motorsport Tickets is the first choice of fans who want to experience the thrill of live racing all over the world. With a pan European presence, we offer all ticket and hospitality options for the Formula 1, MotoGP and World Endurance Championships, alongside the iconic Le Mans 24 hour and historic Isle of Man TT.

Fans buying from Motorsport Tickets also get greater value thanks to the unique benefits and bundles that come with being part of the world’s largest motorsport digital media platform including free access to Autosport Plus, Motorsport Prime and Motorsport TV subscriptions. Post-race ticket buyers also receive a package of professional images after the event courtesy of Motorsport Images. As a result of the SportStadion integration, Dutch fans will benefit from decades of experience, and it’s 5-star customer service.

Motorsport Network, the global leader in digital media and experiences business for enthusiasts of cars and motorsport. Every month 56 million users in 81 countries, visit a Motorsport Network platform. From market leading racing brands like

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